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Discrimination at school

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#21
offline pabird

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As a generalisation there is no such thing as the good old days, the good days are now
But, todays lack of respect throughout every level of society is a modern move in attitude
Casual violance is new, the mods,rockers and teddies etc battled each other not OAPs

#22
offline Little Miss Urchin

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So OAP's were never attacked in years gone by?

#23
offline Mr Happy

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Certainly not as often as these days.

#24
offline pabird

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Hand on heart I do not remember a single attack where sexual attacks by teenagers on female OAPs took place
In general terms virtually unknown in my youth in the 50s and in working class London if an old man or women was attacked then the local "faces" would attend to the attackers in there own way should they discover who?
The other issue is that people would go to assist the person being attacked, not today they do!nt
But probably the most significant difference is in having police on the streets who were known to the community
They new the local toe rags, they understood the local problems and they knew where to look to locate miscreants


#25
offline Mr Happy

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I was a youth in the late 70s and early 80s. Yes, I guess we would back chat to OAPs but would never dream of assaulting them.

#26
offline BOROMAN

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It is worse because the outcome is more horrific. When I was a kid, if I was over a park for example and come across a gang of kids, the worse that would happen to me would be a few bruises.

Nowdays its quite possible I would be stabbed or set on fire. Not in most cases I grant you but the possibility is now much higher than it was before because it now happens.

We can argue all day about the degree of danger there is now compared with times gone by, what we really need to concentrate on is what we are going to do about it. It'a about time in this country that the majority (who are mainly reasonable law abiding people) started dictating terms to the minority (scum).Softly softly has not worked, because we wouldn,t be in the mess we are now if it had.

#27
offline The Invisible Man

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A number of interesting points here.

It is pretty clear that the perception and fear of violence is far worse than the reality, a fear fueled by TV and the papers - particularly the tabloids, combined with the rose tinted view if the past that LMU refers to.

It may be useful to contemplate Dickensian 19th century London, for example. Surely no-one is going to suggest that it was safer than today? Footpads, highwayman and other ruffians were of course rife in earlier periods. I also recall my father telling me about a part of Enfield - yes leafy suburban Enfield (alrighht, in the east, in Brimsdown)- around Jute Lane, that was completely lawless, being cut off in n island formed by the river and the railway. Police would not venture there at night, when the level crossing was shut, and only in two's or more in teh day. This was in the 20's and 30's.

Some serious academic research on the number of attacks on elderly people in various decades would be more useful than vague recollecections of how nice things used to be.

However, having said all that, it certainly seems that casual violence - muggings and the like - is far more common now and are almost regarded as a necessary evil and a fact of life. I myself was attacked one night a few months ago, to my astonishment the ruffians were no more than 1 (they ran away empty handed.) The children of several of my colleagues have been "mugged", some more than once. There is actually little point in reporting these matters as there is not even an attempt to investigate the matter. Now it is well know where large groups of youngsters gather at night - a prowling police car, or even better coppppers on foot, should disperse these groups and have a presence in certain areas. But tey are under-manned, over-run with paperwork and tied down with "rules of engagement".

I agree that the underlying problem is one of society and I believe, the abdication of personal responsibilty. Everything is someone else's fault now, and education is all "child centred".

Savage sentencing is unlikely to have any beneficial effect. The US has one of the worst violent crime records in the world, for example.

#28
offline Halifax Lass

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Quote:
The Invisible Man said:
I myself was attacked one night a few months ago, to my astonishment the ruffians were no more than 1 (they ran away empty handed.)


You don't half rant on Invis!!! Blimey they must have been very forward one year olds if they ran away. Most one year olds are only just capable of walking!!! <img src="/images/graemlins/grin.gif" alt="" /> <img src="/images/graemlins/grin.gif" alt="" /> <img src="/images/graemlins/grin.gif" alt="" />

#29
offline The Invisible Man

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Some people enjoy my rants, Lass!

Err, yes, I missed the key, it should have been 16.

#30
offline BOROMAN

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How did the 16 year old mug you. You are invisible!

#31
offline Mr Happy

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Spotted the imprints made by his invisible zimmer frame!

#32
offline Badger

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Quote:
The Invisible Man said:I agree that the underlying problem is one of society and I believe, the abdication of personal responsibilty. Everything is someone else's fault now, and education is all "child centred".


This is so true.

I know a boy who at the age of nine was unable to tell the time from an analogue clock. His parents said it was the school's fault.

My wife looks after a number of very young children, and some of them are so far behind the expected abilities of their age (basic things like talking, walking) it is worrying - some of their parents would rather go out and have a few drinks than stay at home playing with their kids.

#33
offline Little Miss Urchin

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Parents like these deserve to have privilages taken away. Not sure how it would be done or what would be removed, but they chose to have them, they should take the consequences and bring their children up properly.

(*LMU gets on high horse*) When I have children I will do so because my husband and I want them and are able to look after them and believe we can bring them up well. Hopefully I'll be able to give up my job to look after the little darlings full time, but even if this is not financially possible the only job I would consider taking on would be one that fit in around little Rod, Jane and Freddie.

It seems to me that a majority of the children who do cause trouble do so because their parents don't give a damn/don't know how to bring up children. My Mum used to work in a play group and often told me of times when one boy would actually hit another child. Mum would tell the parent in the hope the child would be told in a stern what they did was wrong, only to witness the mother gently telling git-boy that it was not right. Good god, if I ever done something like that Mum would come down on me like a ton of bricks and I'd be in floods of tears. But I'd never do it again.

It seems to me people want too much these days and are all too willing to let their children suffer in order to get it.


Sorry if I've stepped on anyone's toes here....and for going on.

#34
offline Big J R

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Too much generalisation on here !

Not ALL kids are scruffy little toe-rags, and, as is the norm, the minority make it look bad for the majority.

My eldest Grand-Daughter, (12), adores school, and was getting do bored at the end of the summer holiday, she said to me, she wished she could just go back to school, EARLY, so she could carry on learning. Does this place her in the minority ??

The whole issue stems from lack of discipline.

Bring back the birch, hanging, and National Service, I say !

#35
offline Mr Happy

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the birch and national service yes but I would never want to see capital punishment brought back.

Now that little chestnut should get this thread even hotter than it is now!

#36
offline Stu B

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I think we should bring back the cane!No seriously i do!

#37
offline Mr Happy

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I totally agree. I get totally p***** off with these do gooders who say that corporal punishment and even smacking your child is wrong.

#38
offline Little Miss Urchin

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Exactly. The only reason you should fear it is if you've done something to be given it!

#39
offline Stu B

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Precisely!I also agree with Mr.Happy about smacking,i was smacked as a child and it never did me any harm...well..... <img src="/images/graemlins/wink.gif" alt="" />
Of course it depends on the parents,some parents might take it too far and i suppose thats the " do gooders " arguement,but in the main i think people are trustworthy enough.


#40
offline Little Miss Urchin

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If (when!) I did something wrong I knew about it and boy did I make sure I didn't do it again. Was only smacked once, but really did deserve it.




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