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The A Level Results

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I read on th BBC website that 96.7% of A level exam entrants passed. Bearing in mind that entries are made some months before that exam so some entrants may not finish the course and sit the exam, and that some entrants may be ill and not be able to attend is it unrealistic to assume that 2 or 3 % of entrants may not in fact take the exam.

 

This leads to the conclusion that basically you just have to turn up and get the admin - candidate number and exam title/number correct to pass.

 

What a waste of time for everyone.

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Originally Posted By: Yellow Bungle
I read on th BBC website that 96.7% of A level exam entrants passed. Bearing in mind that entries are made some months before that exam so some entrants may not finish the course and sit the exam, and that some entrants may be ill and not be able to attend is it unrealistic to assume that 2 or 3 % of entrants may not in fact take the exam.

This leads to the conclusion that basically you just have to turn up and get the admin - candidate number and exam title/number correct to pass.

What a waste of time for everyone.


or perhaps, in the more rational world...those heading for failure, are directed onto more vocational, and other levels of course, before they reach the final exam stage.
A lot of the marks are tied up in coursework for some subjects, so it is easier than ever to predict, accurately the final grade.....

........those taking the final exam, do not "just have to turn up", THEY WOULD HAVE HAD TO PROVE THEIR WORTH OVER 2 YEARS, before reaching that stage....Then, they are graded A-E upon the conclusion of their course/and exam.....

Those who work hardest, will achieve the A*, thiose who take the exam lightly, may find a B drops to a D, for example !

Students are not cleverer, Exams are not easier, they are just different and more focused...

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My son who has special needs has 7 GCSE passes.He is not clever it is just too difficult to fail nowadays.

As i have mentioned before,a 11 year child could pass the F G paper in Mathmatics and English.

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I think we'll have to agree to disagree.....A levels are much different from 10-15 years ago...they are now AS/A2's for example.

 

Students study a lot for them, and work hard for two years for them.

Teachers know how to get their students to succeed and also work hard to make this happen

 

To say they are easier, is just too simplistic

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If you assume that evolution has not resulted in significant intellectual development in the last 20 years then you would expect that if standards of qualifications remained the same and the amount of entrants remained the same then the distribution of results would remain similar. Indeed if, as has been the case, increasing numbers of people are taking A levels then it is not unreasonable to assume that as these people would not have been previously taking A levels as they would not have has sufficient academic qualifications, then the distribution wold skew away from the previously established normal towards fail.

 

To maintain the normal you would have to make the exams easier to pass. To skew the distribution towards pass, as has happened, the exams would need to be even easier.

 

Okay, you could argue that socio-economic considerations have enabled more academic but socially disadvantaged kids to take A levels, but I don't think that this is the case since the 1980s - if you were looking at the 1960s you mighth have a point.

 

In reality GD, it is simple - just like the exams are these days.

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